Hit-Maker Branding: Launch your Brand with a Music Industry, A&R Perspective

Nielsen estimates that “by the end of 2011, [there were] 181 million blogs around the world, up from 36 million only five years earlier in 2006.”

Let that sink in for a moment…

Now, ask yourself, how many of those blogs are producing hits?

I’m talking about the kind of stuff viral dreams are made of – shares, links, comments, buzz, traffic, massive subscription lists, sales, etc.

The answer? Very few.

Now ask yourself this: How many think theirs has hit potential?

The answer? All of them!

And many are trying to create an online brand. But not everyone has what it takes to create a hit industry blog, which is why you only have a few breakout stars in each industry. And if you’re using your company blog or website to build an influential brand, this is what you are up against.

Sound impossible? It’s not.

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I put in a lot of hard work around a simple brand concept I call “The A & R Perspective”.

The A & R Man Said, “I Don’t Hear a Single”

I’ll get to the details in a moment, but first a quick marketing lesson about the music industry.

In a nutshell, here’s what record labels are looking for:

A talented artist and a hit single.

The talented singer part is probably no shock to you, but why a hit single? Because that’s what leads to multi-platinum album sales, sold out concerts, and legions of fans buying merchandise.

In other words, a musician doesn’t have a brand until they have a hit.

So, the record companies create A&R (Artist and Repertoire) departments and hire executives to scout new talent and hit songs. These people have a pretty sweet job. But don’t be fooled, scouting isn’t easy.

Why? Because every artist thinks they’ve got the “it factor” and the next smash song. And 99% of them don’t. (Hmm… sound familiar?)

So, what does an A & R executive look for?

Oh, they’re just looking for talent and:

Buzz factor, a strong work ethic, an established fan base, strong web presence, a proven ability to sell songs, someone who isn’t overwhelmed with other commitments or debt, someone that is compatible with recent trends, and strongly positioned with a fresh image, look, and sound.

You didn’t think they just want talent, did you?

So how does this lesson apply to you and your business?

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